By & For Ace Survivors

By & For Ace Survivors 2018-04-09T23:06:53+00:00

This is a category of posts written by ace survivors, for ace survivors. More posts available on our #by ace survivors for ace survivors Tumblr tag.

We are always open to submissions.

I don’t want to call it CSA

By | September 23rd, 2016|

My culture gives us very specific narratives of sexual violence — a short script, narrow roles, cardboard characters with tightly scripted lines that don't account for the diversity of reality.  Any deviation from the imposed mold feels "fake."  The way I figure, the more you hear the real stories that don't follow that short script, the easier it might be discard it altogether.

Components of Resilience: Creativity & Adaptability

By | June 30th, 2016|

This is part four of a series of posts dedicated to breaking down components of resilience. The series is an elaboration on a post I made in 2015, continued now as part of the June 2016 Carnival of Aces on Resiliency. In part one of this series, I covered tenacity. In part [...]

Components of Resilience: Support Network & Discernment

By | June 29th, 2016|

Support networks are a crucial part of resilience, and may even perhaps be the most important factor. It's not hard to find evidence of the health impacts of isolation or the protective effects of having supportive community. Those with strong support networks are less likely to develop PTSD and among those who still do, good support is likely to significantly reduce symptom severity. In order to have a healthy support network, you need to be able to recognize what healthy relationships look like. If you can't recognize when a relationship is becoming unhealthy, you can't take steps to keep yourself safe. Discernment is the skill of perceiving, understanding, and exercising good judgment. A person with "discerning tastes" is someone who has strong preferences about aesthetic quality, like a gourmand. The psychological use of the term is much broader—it is more related to perception and decision-making in general.

Components of Resilience: Affect Management & Positive Frameworks

By | June 25th, 2016|

This is part two of a series of posts dedicated to breaking down components of resilience. The series is an elaboration on a post I made in 2015, and is continued now as part of the June 2016 Carnival of Aces on Resiliency. In part one, I introduced the series [...]

Components of Resilience: Tenacity

By | June 23rd, 2016|

Have you ever gone through a time where things just keep coming? Where you keep getting knocked down, over and over and over again, every time you try to stand back up and start over? That's me this past year. I don't really feel tenacious. I feel more like I'm under-leveled. And the only way to level up is just by grinding. Boring, frustrating grinding. Here's the thing that I think people are apt to misunderstand about tenacity: It's not about never falling, or about how long you stay on the ground after you fall. That doesn't matter. It's just about getting back up, and trying again.

Asexuality, hypothyroidism, and PTSD

By | September 23rd, 2015|

The only reason they found out that I have hypothyroidism at all is because I decided to try some medication for PTSD, so they screened me for it. PTSD shares some of the same symptoms—poor memory and concentration, depression, and fatigue (from PTSD affecting the quality of sleep). Some of my other symptoms could have been explained by other factors, too. So I think it went undiagnosed for a long time.

Personal narrative from an anonymous author

By | September 15th, 2015|

My experiences have caused me to lose faith in the idea that people will come to understand and acknowledge my sexuality without an explicit statement that I am asexual. Even this statement rarely generates understanding or compassion from friends; usually I am met with confusion, discomfort, or even silent denial in the form of attempting to steer the conversation elsewhere.

Triggers Everywhere: Refocusing in College After Trauma

By | August 25th, 2015|

College can be hard even when nothing traumatic happens to you – especially in a physical therapy doctorate program – but navigating hallways where you could pass your rapist at any moment is hard on another level. And on a small campus, where he’s popular and you’re not? It can feel like all you can do is brace yourself. Forget support systems or telling anyone his name.

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